May 162011
 
So today Puma joined the ranks of sustainable business leaders, stole a march on competitors, and fielded that invaluable asset, a smart and human CEO, to unveil an ambitious way of accounting for the Puma supply chain’s impact on biodiversity, putting a price on eco system services from cotton field to consumer use. There’s coverage aplenty on all good news sites, but it’s worth reiterating briefly why this news is getting good coverage despite several other global news stories.
  1. It’s new, different and can claim a level of innovation not seen in the sports apparel sector (and indeed many others) to date
  2. The company isn’t saying it’s green, it’s illustrating how hard it is to be green, by highlighting the negatives of its supply chain impact
  3. The company CEO is not only leading, you can tell he’s been involved throughout by the way he answers tricky questions
  4. The communication is authentic, doesn’t overclaim, and addresses emerging challenges. It’s therefore hard to attack as greenwash
  5. The business case is being made effectively for why ignoring ecosystem services is a commercial risk. Others will copy it – which is good.
All enough to win a fair hearing by cynical London media, a John Snow treatment of the CEO, from which the latter emerged unscathed, and tons of favourable social media buzz. I don’t know who was behind today’s communications, but hats off to them. And well done Puma. 

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